Twenty Years of Forgetfullness

Jan 22

[video]

Jan 18

A Murle woman gets water in Pibor, a town that was recently attacked by thousands of Nuer warriors. Brutal inter tribal conflicts continues to ravage Jonglei state in South Sudan.

Murle woman gets water in Pibor, a town that was recently attacked by thousands of Nuer warriors. Brutal inter tribal conflicts continues to ravage Jonglei state in South Sudan.

Jan 17

[video]

Jan 03

Murle youth stand guard outside a NGO compound after tribal clashes erupted between the Murle and the Jie tribe in 2010. Over the last week 6000 members of the Luo Nuer tribe have destroyed Murle land, fighting continues in Pibor the under developed Murle capital as the UN continues all civilians to flee. Thousands have already died in inter tribal clashes between the Murle and Lou Nuer. 

Murle youth stand guard outside a NGO compound after tribal clashes erupted between the Murle and the Jie tribe in 2010. Over the last week 6000 members of the Luo Nuer tribe have destroyed Murle land, fighting continues in Pibor the under developed Murle capital as the UN continues all civilians to flee. Thousands have already died in inter tribal clashes between the Murle and Lou Nuer. 

Dec 05

[video]

Goa, Mali. A desert city beyond Timbuktu. 

Goa, Mali. A desert city beyond Timbuktu. 

Nov 24

Walking out of the dark gas clouds of Tahrir and into the brightly lit streets of downtown Cairo, where life goes on as normal is a surreal experience. No one is dying, or throwing rocks, or firing tear gas, yet this normalcy is directly tied to what happens in those few dark blocks of Cairo just around the corner. 
 
Streets like Monsour or Mohammed is where the fate of this country rests, in the hands of a few scrappy youths who won’t give up an impossible dream: To tear down the countries most powerful institution with their dirty, soot-covered hands.

Read the full dispatch on Vice.com

Walking out of the dark gas clouds of Tahrir and into the brightly lit streets of downtown Cairo, where life goes on as normal is a surreal experience. No one is dying, or throwing rocks, or firing tear gas, yet this normalcy is directly tied to what happens in those few dark blocks of Cairo just around the corner. 
 
Streets like Monsour or Mohammed is where the fate of this country rests, in the hands of a few scrappy youths who won’t give up an impossible dream: To tear down the countries most powerful institution with their dirty, soot-covered hands.
Read the full dispatch on Vice.com

Nov 15

Back in Libya

I just arrived in Misarata on a flight full of wounded rebels. The town is still standing, groups of women in hijab and burkhas shop in well stocked stores beneath gaping holes left by Gadaffi’s mortars. Not so many guns on the streets, but lots of young men. It’s good to be back in a free Libya, but everyone intensely waiting to see what this actually means. Always strange to see a place that was once the center of the journalistic world for hundreds of reporters, now empty. But the stories remain, and easy to see the ways the aftermath of this conflict will effect generations to come, for better and worse. 

Nov 13

“Now that we’re done panicking, it’s time for journalism thinkers to turn to the real task: how to re-empower reporters, the backbone of journalism, whoever they are, wherever they may work, in whatever medium, within institutions that can move the needle.” — Confidence Game - By Dean Starkman attacks the “Future of News” gurus, promote a slower journalism focused on good reporting. 

Nov 11

[video]

Nov 10

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function,” — F. Scott Fitzgerald

[video]

[video]

Nov 09

[video]

So, the situation is grim, but not hopeless. The relative decline America has entered requires something a good deal more complex than fiscal austerity. The U.S. will remain the world’s most important nation well into this century—that’s not a question. How we handle the implications of our relative decline—not only at home, but around the world where we have maintained the balance of power in region after region since 1945—will matter enormously. Unraveling our global commitments in a way that does not prompt a geopolitical “Lehman Bros.” moment will be the true test of whether the United States was, as we like to believe, better than past hegemons. - Michael Moran on Slate.

So, the situation is grim, but not hopeless. The relative decline America has entered requires something a good deal more complex than fiscal austerity. The U.S. will remain the world’s most important nation well into this century—that’s not a question. How we handle the implications of our relative decline—not only at home, but around the world where we have maintained the balance of power in region after region since 1945—will matter enormously. Unraveling our global commitments in a way that does not prompt a geopolitical “Lehman Bros.” moment will be the true test of whether the United States was, as we like to believe, better than past hegemons. - Michael Moran on Slate.